Cipher

Cipher: (n). a secret or disguised way of writing; a code.

Over the years I have come to the conclusion that everything is a cipher.

Literally everything.

Although some people put their confidence in Holy Books, those volumes themselves borrow so much from each other that one has to realize that the mortals who gathered the information and bound them were fully aware of the cipher that lay within.

If the words found in the Book of Genesis are as important as the words found in the Book of Revelation, then someone didn’t develop the story very well.

A certain amount of religious rhetoric, political punditry and “business blowhard” cries for the purity of the original idea.

But let’s be honest–Kentucky Fried Chicken no longer insists that it’s “finger-lickin’ good,” because most people don’t lick their fingers anymore.

More enlightened believers don’t demand that homosexuals be stoned because deeper ciphers within the Book warn us of the greater dangers of judging and throwing rocks.

And truthfully, believing that a bunch of people should get together sometime in December every four years to pick a President, who has already been voted on by the masses, must very soon be ridiculed back into the history books.

Life is a cipher.

Normally what may appear to be obvious at first needs to have additional information and time to reveal the richer hidden meaning.

 

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Ability

by J. R. Practix

dictionary with letter A

Ability: n. 1. the capacity to do something 2. talent that enables someone to achieve a great deal: a man of exceptional ability.

Let me see if I’ve got this straight. Sometimes we think certain words mean the same thing, but if you look really carefully, you see that they don’t. So I have it figured this way: talent is what I think I can do, and ability is your opinion of my effort after I’ve completed it.

I know I’m always nervous when I hear somebody brag about their talent. I alway silently want to tell them to be quiet; play it cool. Don’t be such a blowhard. Because each one of us human beings has two different modes in which we perceive the performance or presentation of others. If we think they’re conceited, we put on our “mean” mind and get very, very picky. If we believe they are leading with a humble spirit, we are much more relaxed and willing to be forgiving.

So even though many people feel they have talent, their egomaniacal approach towards self-promotion makes the world around them judge their talent and pronounce a very low grade on their ability.

So maybe we don’t know how good we are until other people tell us the value of what we’ve shared or produced. Of course, we don’t like that. We are so preoccupied with our self-image that we would like to control all of the aspects of our offering to the world, including deciding for them what they’re going to think about it.

But it just ain’t so, Joe.

That’s why I think it’s better to play down your talent and come strong with your gift, so when people judge your ability, they will be much more merciful and generous. If you happen to be excellent on top of that, be prepared to be successful.

Talent is what I think I can do, and ability is the grade card you give me at the end of my test.