Complete

Complete: (v) to finish making or doing

And Alexander “wept because there were no more worlds to conquer”–a sentiment, I’m sure, shared by Napoleon Bonaparte.

Then there were a bunch of Puritans stepping onto a rock in Massachusetts, having arrived in the New World which they believed would funny wisdom on words that begin with a Ccomplete them–but actually nearly killed them.

It’s the bell that rings at the end of the day, telling us that work is done and dinner is prepared. Simpler times.

Or it is the bell rung at the end of the fight, that lets the beleaguered pugilists know they can stop punching.

It is a silly statement made by a man to a woman before he proposes marriage, claiming that “she completes him.”

It is the advertisement on the box that informs you that all the pieces are included and it is complete (until you discover there are two missing bolts.)

It is Christ hanging on the cross, saying “it is finished,” having already told his disciples hours earlier that his actual ministry was complete by doing the work of loving mankind and passing God’s message onto them.

It is what each of us hopes we will think when we come to the end of our journey.

Rather than sensing regret, we hope we will feel complete.

 

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