Crestfallen

funny wisdom on words that begin with a C

Crestfallen: (adj) dejected and discouraged

It is astounding to me how many words have been exiled to the “Island of Unwanted Syllables.”

They used to be popular–then somebody or a bunch of nobodies got together and decided they sounded old-fashioned. Of course, that was their death knell. Anything that sounds old-fashioned to a younger generation is immediately rejected and becomes a code word for uncool.

Crestfallen is certainly a better term to describe what occasionally happens to us humans, instead of falling back on dimmer terms, like depressed, bummed out, or under the weather.

I guess we favor the term “depressed” because it seems to have a clinical, physiological component to it, instead of just being us, greatly disappointed and discouraged. I suppose I could even give you a list of things that leave me crestfallen, which make me wish that life was different or that circumstances were changed, or people were more enlightened.

But sharing these pains and frustrations with you would only end up being depressing, with me unable to use the more effective term of crestfallen.


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Antithesis

dictionary with letter A

Antithesis: (n) something or someone who is the direct opposite of something or someone else. i.e. Selfishiness is the antithesis of love.

It’s all about the word “as.”

Even though I may be criticized for arguing with Webster’s Dictionary, since it is considered to be the ultimate authority on wording and meaning, I must tell you that calling selfishness the antithesis of love is a bit old-fashioned, uninspired and lacks practical application.

Sometimes we just say stuff because we think it sounds noble. Things like, “selfishness is the antithesis of love.”

“Love your neighbor as yourself.”

I suppose if people were diagramming that sentence or looking for focus words they would choose love, neighbor or yourself, but actually, the key word is “as.” For after all, we actually do love other people in complete proportion to how we view and embrace “us.”

  • If we are plagued by too much insecurity, we tend to be suspicious of others.
  • If we’re too boastful and self-indulgent, we make the dangerous assumption that other people are the same as us, so we end up suspicious.

What truly is the antithesis of love is fear–and the worst fear in the world is to be afraid to honestly accept who we are.

Until fear is addressed, love is a theory.

Until anxiety is ministered to, we will have a tendency to fret and fume, allowing opportunity to slip away.

So if you take the big three–faith, hope and love–and look for the antithesis to each, I believe you will end up with a trio of human “nasties” which plague us all.

For I would say the antithesis of faith is presumption–people who assume that everything will be taken care of because they are special.

And the antithesis of hope is lying. Yes, nothing is more frustrating to our hope than when we are lied to by those who feel they can manipulate us.

And as I have already said, I believe the antithesis of love is fear.

What would happen if we just took one week of our lives and addressed the presumption, lying and fear which haunt our efforts, and reveal them for the charlatans they truly are?

At the very least … we might just begin to believe in faith, hope and love again.

 

 

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Thank you for enjoying Words from Dic(tionary) —  J.R. Practix