Decriminzalize

Decriminalize: (v) to eliminate criminal penalties for or remove legal restrictions against

What is a crime?

What constitutes an action that is so flagrantly opposed to human growth and appreciation that it requires punishment?

Why do we need crimes?

Why do we call some of these crimes misdemeanors because we’ve decided they’re not as serious as others?

And therefore, what would constitute the purpose for decriminalizing an activity?

The example under discussion today, of course, is marijuana.

The thesis is that since marijuana is not any more addictive or dangerous than alcohol, why do we allow alcohol and arrest people for using marijuana?

This issue has brought about a growing intensity for the legalization of pot. Matter of fact, many states already have it in place.

And far be it from me to compare alcohol and marijuana to each other to establish a favorable conclusion for booze.

But it does come back to what constitutes a crime. A crime is any situation which places other human beings in jeopardy.

Does marijuana do that?

If marijuana were decriminalized, how would that work?

Like cigarettes, it couldn’t be smoked in public.

So the whole purpose of legalizing marijuana would be to make sure that nobody had to go to jail just because they used it.

Is it possible to decriminalize it without legalizing it?

Is it plausible to do the same thing with alcohol?

We have accomplished this with cigarettes—they are decriminalized, but not exactly legal—since they are looked down on and pushed out of our society.

I don’t think anybody should have to spend time in jail for smoking marijuana.

But if you don’t mind, please keep them from using heavy machinery and driving cars on our crowded highways.

Corn

Corn: (n) a tall cereal plant having a jointed, solid stem and bearing the grain, seeds, or kernels on large ears.

I tried to get lost in America.

Many times.

Although I visited every large city, there were occasions in my touring, travels and interaction with the populace that I purposely placed myself deeper and deeper into smaller and smaller regions.

It was enlightening.

It was invigorating to drive down a country road at twilight and not see a building taller than two stories for ten miles in any direction.

What I could never escape was corn.

It’s everywhere.

I judged my tours by its growth.

I began each tour traveling when little, tiny green heads were barely popping out of the earth.  Matter of fact, someone would have to point out that the “field over there” was corn, because it looked like a promising acre of weeds.

Time passed.

I logged some more numbers on my odometer, and now the green weed was nearly knee high—often before the fourth of July.funny wisdom on words that begin with a C

But it still didn’t look like much.

More travel, more little towns. More diners which surprised me with a particular delicacy that tickled my fancy.

The corn just kept growing.

Pretty soon you could make out tiny ears sprouting, getting ready to hear further instructions from Mother Nature.

And then—all at once—there were huge fields of it in all directions. Corn stalks blowing in the breeze, chock-full of magnificent cobs, ready for the munching.

It was delicious.

But it was also forewarning—the warmth in the air was soon to be replaced, and traveling gypsies like me needed to find warmer climates, and spend my time watching the oranges grow.


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