Cranny

Cranny: (n) small, narrow opening in a wall, rock, etc.; a chink

 Some people just get better advertising.

This is also true for words.

And on that occasion when we create a phrase, one of the elements of that thought often gets more attention than the other.

Never was this more evident than in the case of “nook and cranny.”funny wisdom on words that begin with a C

Can you explain to me why “cranny,” which got second billing, is also totally ignored and misunderstood?

We know what a nook is. Matter of fact, we’ve even created one for breakfast.

But do we have a cranny in our home that stands by itself—without the aid of its overbearing nook?

Matter of fact, when the word was brought up to me today I nearly passed over it, thinking it to be so obscure that it was unworthy of my comment—and that it might cause the reader to bustle away, perplexed,  wondering why anyone would tarry to give a passing insight on such a loser.

But would there be “nook” without “cranny?”

Would “nook” have ever gained any attention if it had not hooked up with its traveling partner?

Would people have adopted the phrase, “I searched every nook of the house…” if they also didn’t pursue the “cranny?”

As is often the case in the human journey, it is one that carries the weight, and another which takes the bows.

 

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Circumstance

Circumstance: (n) a condition connected with or relevant to an event or action

“Considering the circumstance…”

Damn it, don’t lie to me. You’re not really going to let me consider my circumstance. You might like to pretend you will, so that I will
consider yours.

The true breath of fresh air which enlivens the human brain is that second place cannot be excused away due to circumstance.

We might get sympathy. Some people might even agree that we got an unfair shake.

But once they walk away from us and talk to others, they will call second place what it is–a loss.

The time to consider circumstance is before an endeavor is begun, not after it’s been anemically performed.

It’s not so much that we love winners as it is that we hate losers.

If someone is able to lose with the understanding that there was a personal deficit, we’re willing to allow them into the competition again to acquire a second chance.

Even Apollo Creed gave Rocky an additional crack at the title, because Rocky did so well the first time and did not pretend he won. (Please forgive the obscure reference to a forty-year-old movie.)

What can I do to convince myself that pleading “circumstance” only makes me look like I’m needy instead of letting people know that I am fully aware that I fell short and am prepared to change things up?

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