Charger

Charger: (n) Archaic a large, flat dish; platter

Long, long ago, when an epidemic of the simple common cold could kill people off by the thousands, a flat serving tray was referred to as a “charger.”

It has very little significance to us, as we now view a small cord which attaches to our phone as the only charger of note.

But long ago, when a young girl breathlessly finished a dance, nearly naked from her exuberant efforts, her step-father, a king, greatly
aroused by her choreography, promised to give her anything she wanted as payment for her little strip-tease.

He was obviously staring down at a beautiful temptation, and also at the evidence that she had succeeded in waking up the “little king.”

She was a nasty little vixen, with a mother who had been trained to be ruthless and cruel. So the two of them got together, and the girl requested the head of John the Baptist–“on a charger.”

(This is origin of the slogan, “I want his head on a silver platter.” I assume that the request for the platter was to express extreme indifference.)

But it is a warning.

For the Prophet John made the mistake of generating enemies of souls with no conscience.

And the young girl, who had been raised by a bedeviled mother to use the lust of men to her advantage, was able to take the Baptist’s indiscretion in judging a queen, and the queen’s fury over his insolence, and turn it into a tragedy.

It teaches us all that we should choose our words carefully — and avoid making enemies of people who really wouldn’t mind putting our fate on a plate.

 

Donate ButtonThank you for enjoying Words from Dic(tionary) —  J.R. Practix 

 

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Ambush

dictionary with letter A

Ambush: 1. (n) a surprise attack by people lying in wait in a concealed position 2. (v) to make a surprise attack on someone from a concealed position

It all depends from what perspective you view this experience.

If you are the ambusher, you find your tactics to be clever, inventive, cost-saving and ingenious.

If you are the ambushee, you will contend that the same actions are conniving, vicious, unfair and animalistic.

We think that certain behavior is acceptable as long as we come up with it and implement it to our common good. It is what makes us both human and obnoxious.

Candidly, a world without a Golden Rule, which insists that we try on an experience to see how it feels if done unto ourselves before we target it toward another person–well, a world without that kind of consideration is vile, unpredictable and destructive.

How can we ambush other people while thinking that all we’re trying to do is communicate our feelings?

1. If another human being doesn’t have the right to disagree without looking ridiculous, then we’ve robbed them of their God-given blessing of purpose and individuality.

2. If our sharing with another person is done in front of other folks for convenience or back-up, we have removed the generosity that allows our friends to repent if they’ve erred and to learn if they lack information.

3. The instinct to capture folks in their moment of weakness and attack them is never noble, even if we think it’s producing spiritual conclusions.

Here’s the truth: human beings don’t have to be right.

God, Himself, does not go around plotting trials and tribulations for those who are in rebellion to reason. That’s why the Good Book says “it rains on the just and the unjust” and “the sun shines on the good and the bad.”

So if God doesn’t ambush jerks, get your helmet off. There’s no war.

And “ambush” is a term we normally relegate to warfare–when being devious and even ruthless, unfortunately, may be necessary to win the battle and save lives.

But to introduce this concept into everyday interactions with humankind is not only cruel, but in this humble writer’s opinion … damnable.

 

Adobe

Words from Dic(tionary)

dictionary with letter AAdobe: (n) a kind of clay used as a building material

I am so excited.

Finally! In the making of all the Star Wars movies, they are actually doing a sequel based on one of the more obscure characters, but certainly an individual mentioned frequently throughout the saga–a villain not given much of a back story. But after all, Han Solo is constantly trying to run away from him, fears him and ends up temporarily defeated by him, which is pretty remarkable considering the scrapes this cosmic knight survives.

I’m talking about Jabba the Hutt.

They’re thinking about making a movie based just on him. I think it’s brilliant. They will take him back to when he was a little Jabba growing up–going through an explanation of how his early childhood drooling never went away and his inability to speak clearly and concisely was caused by being imprisoned in a cave as a youngster by his even more wicked father–Adobe the Hutt.

Doesn’t that sound fascinating?

Adobe the Hutt was a mercenary fighter purchased by the highest bidder for any ruthless cause that might come his way. Even though his little boy, Jabba, wanted to pursue art and had a natural inclination for small-craft work, Adobe insisted he learn the family business and acquire the murderous traditions of the Hutt clan.

It could be a tear-jerker. It will teach us that human beings–or even Jabbas–are not born evil, but instead, learn foul behavior from their families, friends and the world around them.

So keep an eye out for it–a REAL sequel to Star Wars instead of a made-up one about paper-thin Jedi warriors.

Coming soon: Adobe the Hutt … the story of Jabba.


Adobe

Words from Dic(tionary)

dictionary with letter AAdobe: (n) a kind of clay used as a building material

I am so excited.

Finally! In the making of all the Star Wars movies, they are actually doing a sequel based on one of the more obscure characters, but certainly an individual mentioned frequently throughout the saga–a villain not given much of a back story. But after all, Han Solo is constantly trying to run away from him, fears him and ends up temporarily defeated by him, which is pretty remarkable considering the scrapes this cosmic knight survives.

I’m talking about Jabir the Hut.

They’re thinking about making a movie based just on him. I think it’s brilliant. They will take him back to when he was a little Jabba growing up–going through an explanation of how his early childhood drooling never went away and his inability to speak clearly and concisely was caused by being imprisoned in a cave as a youngster by his even more wicked father–Adobe the Hut.

Doesn’t that sound fascinating?

Adobe the Hut was a mercenary fighter purchased by the highest bidder for any ruthless cause that might come his way. Even though his little boy, Jabba, wanted to pursue art and had a natural inclination for small-craft work, Adobe insisted he learn the family business and acquire the murderous traditions of the Hut clan.

It could be a tear-jerker. It will teach us that human beings–or even Jabbas–are not born evil, but instead, learn foul behavior from their families, friends and the world around them.

So keep an eye out for it–a REAL sequel to Star Wars instead of a made-up one about paper-thin Jedi warriors.

Coming soon: Adobe the Hut … the story of Jabba.


Achilles

by J. R. Practix

dictionary with letter AAchilles: a hero of the Trojan War. During his infancy his mother plunged him into the Styx, making his body invulnerable except for the heel by which she held him. During the Trojan War, Achilles killed Hector but was later wounded in the heel by an arrow shot by Paris, and died.

Since I saw the movie, Troy, Achilles will always be Brad Pitt to me. Or maybe it’s that Brad Pitt will always be Achilles. Whichever floats your boat. And speaking of floating your boat … Supposedly Helen of Troy had an affair with Paris, which started a war and launched a thousand ships.

If you watch the movie, you see the portrayal of a very arrogant, self-sufficient, mean-spirited, dark, quizzical and I suppose to the average woman between the ages of fourteen and twenty-five, sexy Achilles.

He liked killing people.

That should be one of the classic turn-offs, but it seemed to be very exciting to his fellow-fighters and all the women who met him. He was rather ruthless, which the Greeks, who touted themselves to be such a scholarly bunch, still extolled as noble. He considered himself to be invincible, which lends itself to a bit of foolishness and certainly makes one obnoxious.

What did I learn about Achilles? I relearned the very valuable lesson that half of what I believe about myself is only true because it hasn’t been tested, and the other half, that has been tested, I do not believe, for some reason or another, to be sufficient to my needs.

We are all foolish when we think that because we haven’t yet met an enemy who can take us down, that we are beyond conquering. And we’re also quite silly when we downplay the TRUE virtues of our soul and talent, deeming them insignificant.

If Achilles had just been a good soldier, treated people better, and had not run into battle believing he was made of titanium, he probably could have lived to a ripe old age, had children and been deeply respected by the world around him. Instead, he let his ego drive his mission rather than using common sense and restraint.

It’s doubtful that dipping him in the River Styx actually achieved the purpose of making him supernatural. It sure did give him a lot of confidence, though–that is, until somebody shot an arrow in just the right place.

Interesting. Since we talk about Achilles, I wonder if that’s where we got the phrase, “that person’s a real heel.”