Concordance

Concordance: (n) an alphabetical list of the words in a text

There was a season in my life’s journey when I wanted to be a “Reverend.” Not just a minister or preacher, but an actual, full-fledged cleric.

I liked the sound of it. “Reverend.”

At that time, my immature, jealous spirit was anxious to be recognized for doing nothing while having a title. To accentuate this need and punctuate its funny wisdom on words that begin with a C
possibility, I bought myself the “Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance.”

I immediately realized why it had the name “Strong” and “Exhaustive.” To just carry the thing required you to be built like an ox.

I located some churches to pontificate spiritual lessons (in other words, preach sermons) so I opened up my Exhaustive Concordance and found words I wanted to share about, and discovered where they were peppered and placed all over the Bible, and then spent all my time trying to pull together these abstract texts–which were thousands of years apart–and create a cohesive message.

It was “inspiration by committee”–the inspiration being anything anybody could get out of my mish-mash and the committee being a host of ancient Bedouin writers who happened to mention my favored word in some favored way.

It is a horrible way to share truth, persisting to this day.

As I lost my interest in the word “Reverend,” and most of my need to evangelize through my sermonizing, I soon discovered that I no longer needed a concordance.

I just needed to share my life–good and bad–and in so doing, become much more enlightening.

And much less exhaustive.

 

Donate Button


Mr. Kringle's Tales...26 Stories 'Til Christmas

(click the elephant to see what he’s reading!)


Subscribe to Jonathan’s Weekly Podcast

Good News and Better News

 

Antitheical:

dictionary with letter A

Antithetical: (adj) directly opposed or contrasted; mutually incompatible

The old saying is, “Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.”

Truthfully, that’s not the problem.

The difficulty lies in the fact that human beings, having a worshipping nature with a side of adoring, either end up revering the baby and negating the need for water, or insisting that bathing is sacred, and, and murdering the infant.

Alas, extremes tend to be the rallying cry of the human race.

Yet in an attempt to bring peace and tranquility, we force ideas that are not cohesive or even coherent to one another into a small box and insist that they came that way from the manufacturer.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work.

Just as all forms of government are not the same, all men and women have certain talents and attributes, and even a certain shipment of a box of Kleenex will have aberrations, spirituality cannot be lumped into a clump of religions proclaimed equal.

It just isn’t.

And because this is true, I look for tenets of faith that can be shared, but more importantly, I try to discover principles of God that must be enacted.

Then it becomes pretty simple. Any religion, philosophy or plan of action that believes in the revenge of “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” should not only be avoided, but quickly abandoned.

Why? Because it’s anti-human, which makes it dangerous to earth, causing it to be displeasing to any God who would have created us.

So this would include a tremendous number of the religions of the world, including sects and denominations of Christianity, which claim that the Old Testament is just as viable as the New Testament.

After all, Jesus tells us it is wrong to wreak revenge on our enemies.

So everything in life is antithetical to reasonable human progress if it believes that we create fairness by inflicting similar pain on others that they have perpetrated in our direction.

So religion must go.

Avenging nations must be set aside.

And “love your neighbor as yourself” needs to be lifted up on our shoulders.

Bluntly, antithetical to Planet Earth is any notion that we “get ours” by “taking theirs.”

 

Donate Button

Thank you for enjoying Words from Dic(tionary) —¬† J.R. Practix

Alto

dictionary with letter A

Alto: (n.) a voice, instrument or musical part below the soprano and above the tenor

It’s called a triad.

I’m not trying to give you a music lesson. It’s a simple blending of two notes that creates a cohesive and usually very pleasant harmony.

It was the staple of music for generations, but in the past thirty years it has been forsaken in favor of harmonies which stress the fourth and fifth instead of thirds.

Now, understanding that this is much too technical for anyone who does not pursue bass and treble clefs, let me personify it better by saying that if you’ve ever heard a women’s trio sing in a church or civic organization, one of the ladies always carries a harmony which clings to the melody so faithfully that it is almost like a twin.

It is beautiful. It is gorgeous. But for a generation of musicians and composers who favor a bit darker sound to their tunes, it is probably quite annoying.

Matter of fact, the most common way to end a song in today’s market is on the major seventh or with a dangling fifth.

Once again, I’m getting too technical. But understand this: sometimes it’s just lovely to hear a melody accompanied by a triad tripping faithfully along behind. It is a union that reminds us that the universe is not meant to be strident, but is intended to have a soprano …¬†accompanied by a well-tuned alto.