Currier and Ives

Currier and Ives: (n) the lithography firm of Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives, which produced prints of American history, life, and manners.

Why is it necessary to advertise our depletion by criticizing what once brought us completion?

Why are we so sarcastic about elements that at one time brought comfort and joy to our souls?

After all, is cynicism really a belief system?

Is negativity a plan of action? Is sneering the equivalent of smiling?

Does denying have the energy of accepting?

I grew up in America. The country that surrounds me today is still my home—it’s just dirty.

Fortunately, we don’t throw away our bathroom because it needs cleaning, nor do we cast our clothes aside because they’re sullied with dirt.

Clean.

I need visions of where we are to go.

I need to see the best to achieve better.

I require encouragement.

I find it impossible to gain breath and sustenance on a diet of despair.

Currier and Ives once represented the simple life we now sarcastically proclaim ridiculous, and even sometimes insist is insensitive to all cultures.

Does this mean we contend joy, family, warm fires and beautiful pastoral scenes are “white” things?

Is it necessary to express the plight of the poor by having pictures of starving children? Must we alarm others to sickness by offering snapshots of bedsores?

My eyes are thirsty for hope.

I could stand a little Currier and Ives.

funny wisdom on words that begin with a C

Assert

Assert: (v) to state a fact or belief confidently and forcefully.dictionary with letter A

People certainly are more assertive than they used to be.

Sitting over a delicious breakfast of cereal this morning, my traveling partner asked me what I thought was different in our country since 2008.

I find that answer to be very simple: we have changed the default position of kindness to one of assertiveness.

We think it’s important to share our point, prove our point, defend our point and walk away from any conversation with our point not dulled.

So because of that, we have developed a rendition of the American culture and gospel of Jesus Christ mingled together which focuses on our own value to the detriment in consideration of others. It has happened so gradually that lots of people would take exception to this accusation.

But being assertive is not only risking being wrong, it is also cornering ourselves in what we have asserted, and makes us continue to stubbornly pursue ideas which may be ineffective.

So the politicians in our country assert that the problem is that people don’t vote, or that they have little concern for real issues, and that therefore, it is up to the politicians to guide the discussion and make the choices for the masses minus their involvement.

Religion spends so much time asserting either the sinfulness of mankind or our innate goodness that it fails to develop the truth which would make us free, which is that we are capable of good as we are also capable of evil.

And entertainment has no sense of responsibility for anything other than delivering a predictable round of art projects, which cause people to participate–unchanged.

I just don’t assert much anymore.

I think it’s important that the default position for dealing with human beings should be kindness, and that the default position for the work we do should be completion. Just those two things being in place would create a better country.

Because I can assert two definite truths in your direction:

  1. There is no law against kindness.
  2. And completing your work speaks for itself.

 

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