Darrow, Clarence

Darrow, Clarence: (N) a lawyer and author of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, he was known as the defense attorney in the Scopes trial.

There are two ways to err:  (1) making a mistake because you’re being too cautious, and (2) the predicament in which your forward thinking causes you to be too radical.

Let us take a historical journey to consider both.

How often have people from our past been wrong because they followed the party line or continued to promote old ideas that were desperately in need of revision?

And how often were some found guilty of being too progressive or too open-minded?

Seriously—think about it.

The man most religious people follow as being the Savior of the world was declared guilty and crucified for sedition.

What is the definition of sedition? It is conduct or speech inciting people to rebel against authority.

So who, really, was Jesus? Was he a religious icon, martyred for the sins of the world? Or did he come to rebel against the religious tyranny which left people ignorant and was brutally judgmental?

In Tennessee there was a court case which has become known as “the Scopes trial.” A science teacher in a high school was arrested and charged with teaching evolution in his classroom. This was forbidden.

Two attorneys showed up for the confrontation:

  • William Jennings Bryan, who was a Biblical scholar and aspiring politician.
  • And Clarence Darrow, an East Coast attorney who was always looking for a case to challenge the hypocrisies he felt existed in the law.

If you lived in Dayton, Tennessee, at the time of the trial, you would have been convinced that Attorney Bryan was representing the will of God, making a stand against a satanic effort to steal Creation from our Maker, placing it with the evolving monkeys. But if you live today, you are fully aware that William Jennings Bryan was misled and ended up ignorant—on the wrong side of history.

Clarence Darrow, ridiculed by the hometown folks, is now deemed, in our times, to be a hero.

Nothing good happens when people are aware of injustice and remain silent.

But we always must remember:

To be a saint in the future, you must be prepared to be considered a sinner in the present.

 

Better

Better: (adj) an improvement on an existing or previous level or achievement.

Dictionary B

“Better” is in the probing of the critic.

It immediately has sprouts weaknesses:

  1. It has us probing and over-analyzing the good things of life,
  2. And it makes us believe that we are viable or possibly more intelligent by being critical.

Matter of fact, to gain the approval of everyone in the room, all you have to opine is, “I want to get better.”

I suppose it’s because each one of us is intoxicated by the notion of becoming the best. That solitary position, afforded to the individual or even the team that acquires the top position, seems to drive us to the exhaustion of hurrying and worrying.

When is enough, enough?

When do you finish making a great meal, sit down and just enjoy it instead of musing, “You know what this needs?”

When can you have great love-making, and just lay back in ecstasy instead of contemplating the next “better position?”

And when will we finally look across the terrain of our present landscape and point out the attractions that are filled with promise instead of gazing off in the distance, believing there should be more?

Better is an anxious word.

It is filled with dissatisfaction and it often makes us believe that we can do more than we’re actually able to accomplish.

It aggravates the saint and condemns the sinner.

Even though I will probably fall under the spell of those who want to better everything within their purview, for the time being–at least for today–I will enjoy all that I have that is good.

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Thank you for enjoying Words from Dic(tionary) —  J.R. Practix 

 

Alaska

Words from Dic(tionary)

dictionary with letter A

Words from Dictionary

Alaska: (n) the largest state in the U.S., located in northwestern North America, with coasts on the Arctic and North Pacific oceans, separated from the contiguous U.S. states by Canada, pop. 626,932, capital, Juneau.

How appropriate, on this Christmas Day, for the word “Alaska” to fall in my lap, since it is such a snowy, chilly locale, suitable for North Pole occupation and reindeer games.

Yes, I wonder if part of that 626,000 people located in that huge mass of popsicle might include elves and a saint who gives away toys.

I, personally, have not known a lot of people from Alaska. I did have a friend who moved there for a couple of years, because she heard that if you stayed there for 365 days, you would receive a check from the treasury, rewarding you for having the fortitude to live in the climate and maintain residency. I think she stayed for a couple of checks before she realized that having money in a warmer climate, although fewer dollars, was preferrable.

I would like to go up there sometime, but my penchant for wanting to drive everywhere would make for a long sleigh ride, and considering my size, I don’t know if I would be permitted to fly in one of those single-engine planes, land on a lake somewhere and boat my way to the gigs.

So I will just have to hope that the good folks of Alaska will realize my admiration for them and their perseverant attitude toward all things frozen, and allow me to stay warm below. I am more than willing to send a care package … something toasty, perhaps?