Caesar

Caesar: (n) a title used by Roman emperors

There are certain words that just should not be associated with human beings: king, queen, pope, master, lord, dictator, supreme ruler,
emperor and the general title of Caesar.

We are people. We just do too many fruitless, ridiculous, repetitive and common things to ever believe that any backside was polished by the Divine.

Yet when you get in the presence of someone who deems him or herself to be superior, and has come up with a matching handle to enhance the claim, it is fruitless to attempt to chide them to some sanity and awareness of their human roots.

So Caesars fight Caesars to be the Caesar above all Caesars.

Now that’s a tossed salad.

Yet how wonderful it is to walk around with the simple desire to enjoy life and bless other people and casually quip, “Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and unto God the things that are God’s.”

 

 

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Basilica

Basilica: (n) a building similar to a Roman basilica, used as a Christian church.Dictionary B

The battle will always rage.

It is the confrontation introduced by Judas to Jesus when he felt that the Master was foolishly spending money on unnecessary expenses instead of giving alms to the poor.

Honestly, as ridiculous as it is to spend a lot of funds on appearances, it is equally annoying to stand on the corner and lament the choices of others.

Here’s an easy rule I use in my life when deciding if I need a “basilica”–in other words, some edifice or evidence of my success and prowess. I ask this question all the time, and find it most beneficial. I use it for small things and for large decisions, and I find that if I’m candid, I always come up with the right answer, which enables me to avoid unnecessary financial loss, and usually dodge criticism from those who are ready to dole it out free of charge.

Here’s the question: Is this really necessary?

  • I do it with my time.
  • I do it with my family.
  • I do it with my underwear drawer.
  • I do it with my socks.
  • I do it with my car.

When you stop and simply ask yourself if the latest whim to build a basilica is actually going to adv ance your cause, or just burden it with debt, you’ll be astounded at how quickly your common sense will leap forward, attempting to take back control.

Even though I have many opinions on how money is misspent or how it should be given out in larger portions, ultimately it is up to the holder of the treasure … to decide what measure. 

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Arm-wrestling

dictionary with letter A

Arm-wrestling: (n) a trial of strength in which two people sit opposite each other with one elbow resting on a table, clasp each other’s hands, and try to force each other’s arm down onto the table.

Dick was boisterous.

I must apologize for the ambiguity in that sentence. Let me rephrase.

My friend, Richard, had a tendency to be a bit pompous and overwrought. So at a gathering of family and friends, when the conversation had lulled–yet there was still enough chips and dip for everyone to hang around–it was suggested that we have an arm-wrestling competition.

Candidly, I normally quietly slink away from such adventures. It’s not because I’m a wimp. It’s not that I lack physical prowess. It’s just that at any particular time, you can link your paw with another person and discover that they have amazing arm strength–and you can end up looking like a real loser.

So I fell quiet.

Not Dick.

He claimed that he had never been beaten at arm-wrestling. Most of the men in the room were fairly confident that they could whip Dick at this adventure, so they gave him room and pretended he was the master he purported. It was an act of mercy.

But not Candace.

Yes, one of the women in the room decided to challenge Dick to a match.

Candace was strong. Somewhere in my consciousness, I was fully aware that she was capable of beating Dick. I was about to step in and change the subject to spare him the humiliation of the confrontation, when Dick piped up and said, “I could beat any girl.”

Such a bad move.

All the women in the room immediately rallied behind Candace and began to cheer for her, which forced the guys into the decision of either deserting Dick and their masculinity, or giving feigned support to the fool.

There were even some bets.

So Candace and Dick sat down and linked hands for the competition. One of the things I can tell you about arm-wrestling is that once you join your hand with another person, you almost immediately have an awareness of whether you can beat them.

When Richard got into his position with Candace he bleached white. He knew he was in trouble.

And in trouble he was. She whipped him in less than three seconds.

Not only was Dick totally flattened by the experience, but it was never forgotten. And every time after that, when he became prideful, Candace was available to remind him … of his greatest Waterloo.

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Apostle

dictionary with letter A

Apostle: (n.) 1. each of the twelve chief disciples of Jesus Christ. 2. an enthusiastic supporter of an idea or cause.

Titles are what non-talented people cling to in order to avoid being evaluated on the quality of their work.

You can tell exactly how useless these assigned names are by how popular they are in our present-day society, which seems to be stuck in the muck of ego, unable to maneuver in any direction.

I, too, am often asked to produce my running list of titles. These are supposed to be words that inform the hearer that I am worthy of being listened to and that I have jumped through enough hoops to be part of the circus.

I’ve even had people correct me when I’ve addressed them by their first name, to inform me that their title must be included–otherwise they have a sense of what we might call “nomenclature nakedness.”

So instead of granting people dignity and appreciation for their deeds, we bequeath them with titles.

And this is why the original apostles nearly suffocated the message of Jesus of Nazareth–because they spent most of their time sitting around discussing who was greater and who Jesus liked better. In the process they began to kiss up to the very same individuals who originally had crucified their Master.

Fortunately for us, they stopped being apostles and turned back into rag-tag fanatics.

Because I will tell you of a certainty, King George III was not impressed that Benjamin Franklin came up with the idea of electricity or had constructed a stove. He considered him a rebel and a rapscallion and was prepared to hang him.

And the American history books can be grateful that Mr. Franklin did not take offense, but agreed to don the role of rebel so that we might be free.

Titles frighten me. They assume that their mere inclusion should produce respect.

What should give us our respect is whether we follow through on what we say is truly important.

 

 

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